Warriors Recruiting & Mentoring Future Warriors

The East Coast Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

150120-N-SR846-011 VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Jan. 19, 2015) Sailors in the Fleet Transition Program (FTP) gather at sunrise to participate in a weekly beach run. FTP is designed to screen and prepare SEAL and SWCC candidates for entering Basic Underwater Demolition School (BUD/s).  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)
150120-N-SR846-011 VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Jan. 19, 2015) Sailors in the Fleet Transition Program (FTP) gather at sunrise to participate in a weekly beach run. FTP is designed to screen and prepare SEAL and SWCC candidates for entering Basic Underwater Demolition School (BUD/s). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)

There is perhaps no other specialized fighting force in the world that is talked about more, but truly known about less, than the U.S. Navy SEALs. The training and capabilities of the SEALs are legendary, but unlike most legends, people do not really know where they came from. There is also the much less talked about and even less known about, Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewmen (SWCC, pronounced swick). Who are these men and where do they come from? How does someone leave an ordinary life to become part of a legend? And most importantly, for the true warrior at heart, where do I sign up?

For the past eight years the Navy and the Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team have helped find such men, answered their questions and prepared them for the most challenging test of their lives. Its priority is to maintain Naval Special Warfare’s (NSW) level of excellence, and to seek recruits with a diverse culture that fully leverages and values a workforce and environment in which everybody serving in our community is able to achieve their full potential.

The East Coast team is led by retired Master Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Mark Courrier. With the enthusiasm of a kid showing off his new treehouse, every recruit gets treated to the same experience. He springs to his feet and meets them halfway into the room with a handshake and a grin that says, “You gotta see this!” It’s maybe not what most people would expect, but the reputation of ‘crusty old salt’ that is commonly endeared upon a 30-year enlisted U.S. Navy SEAL veteran doesn’t apply here. For Courrier, the goal is for everyone to leave his club house with the same feeling: “Wow, that’s something I want to be a part of.”

“First impressions are lasting impressions,” said Courrier. “For most visitors this is their first impression of NSW. It’s important to get up, move around your desk, and to shake that person’s hand.”

Courrier has been leading the charge of the East Coast team, which is responsible for multiple programs, since its inception in 2007. The Fleet Transition Program (FTP) for Sailors already in the fleet is intended to help Sailors apply to, and/or transition to, Basic Underwater Demolition /SEALs (BUD/S). It also operates an aquatics outreach program that is open to anyone, in or out of the military, who wants to become a SEAL or SWCC team member. Additionally, it does community outreach by sending SEAL and SWCC team members into communities to educate, motivate and inspire youth to follow their dreams.

After 30 years of active duty service and another eight – and counting – of civilian federal employee service, working with young men who are looking to do something important keeps the 56-year-old feeling young. During a four-mile group run on the beach – at sunrise in 35 degree weather – Courrier bragged, “Do you see why I love my job?”

Trainees will learn basic and advanced fundamentals on swimming, running, calisthenics, strength training and other basic SEAL and SWCC skills. Trainees are closely monitored by qualified SEAL and SWCC team members, who will mentor them on core skills required of prospective candidates.

“I didn’t’ get picked up by the SEALs when I first tried,” said Lt. j.g. Ethan Strauser, who is now slated to start BUD/S. “I started coming to the swim program six years ago trying to get with FTP. If you show you are motivated to be SEAL/SWCC they will do everything they can to help you. Commitment is huge. You have to be able to push through road blocks – if this is your dream don’t let anybody tell you no.”

150120-N-SR846-266 VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Jan. 19, 2015) Sailors in the Fleet Transition Program (FTP) participate in daily pool workouts. FTP is designed to screen and prepare SEAL and SWCC candidates for entering Basic Underwater Demolition School (BUD/s).  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)
150120-N-SR846-266 VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Jan. 19, 2015) Sailors in the Fleet Transition Program (FTP) participate in daily pool workouts. FTP is designed to screen and prepare SEAL and SWCC candidates for entering Basic Underwater Demolition School (BUD/s). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Abe McNatt/Released)

Trainees are expected to maintain a positive mental attitude, good military bearing, professionalism and Navy pride.

“Being able to work with people like Mark Courrier is a huge asset,” said Strauser. “He has a very high reputation within the community. He is very consistent with everyone, very passionate and sincere, and will work with anyone on an individual basis.”

When Courrier says the swim program is open to anyone, he means it. Courrier regards one of his biggest successes when he met a 14-year-old, who did not know how to swim, and his mother. Courrier invited him to come to the swim program and started working with him. The young man swam nearly every day. When he was 17 he joined the Navy and did accomplish his dream of becoming a SEAL.

“To become a SEAL/SWCC it’s 95 percent from the neck up, maybe a percent or two is physical and the rest is heart and soul,” said Courrier. “Nobody really comes to us who are not physically fit enough for the job, but that is not enough on its own.”

Helping trainees to be comfortable and confident in the water is a very large aspect of FTP and the swim program.

“The success of the SEAL & SWCC Scout Team is about the team,” said Courrier. “I do my best to instill into these young men to have dreams, have discipline, and most importantly, have fun. We are not instructors here; we are not in a school house. When you put an instructor in front of someone that changes things. We are mentors and coaches, not drill sergeants. I can’t do this job without the volunteers within the East Coast NSW community. This is not a Mark Courrier Success: this is a team success.”

The Navy SEAL and SWCC Scout Team programs are extremely challenging and only for highly motivated individuals seeking a career in NSW. The courses are continuously run and have no start or stop dates.

Potential Fleet candidates should read about the process of converting on www.sealswcc.com and consult MILPERSMAN 1220-330 for SEAL or 1220-400 for SWCC. A visit with a command career counselor will formally begin the process of rating conversion. For additional information contact Mark Courrier at 757-763-3005.

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